Category: Science

Ramesh Raskar: Imaging at a trillion frames per second


Richard Feynman – The Key to Science


Remembering Roger Boisjoly: He Tried To Stop Shuttle Challenger Launch

by Howard Berkes
NPR

Roger Boisjoly was a booster rocket engineer at NASA contractor Morton Thiokol in Utah in January, 1986, when he and four colleagues became embroiled in the fatal decision to launch the Space Shuttle Challenger.

Read It!


Faster Than Light Neutrinos

Science
www.sciencemag.org

New high-precision tests carried out by the OPERA collaboration in Italy broadly confirm its claim, made in September, to have detected neutrinos travelling at faster than the speed of light. The collaboration today submitted its results to a journal, but some members continue to insist that further checks are needed before the result can be considered sound.
Read It!


U.S. Lagging in Using Technology

New York Times
JOHN MARKOFF

Published: April 12, 2011

The United States continues to lag other nations in its use of computing and communications technology, according to an annual study issued Tuesday by the World Economic Forum.

Read It!


Frankenfish Phobia

By Timothy Egan
New York Times

March 17, 2011, 8:30 pm

Read It!


I Can’t Think

I Can’t Think!
by Sharon Begley
Newsweek

The Twitterization of our culture has revolutionized our lives, but with an unintended consequence—our overloaded brains freeze when we have to make decisions.
Read It!


Mind vs. Machine

In the race to build computers that can think like humans, the proving ground is the Turing Test—an annual battle between the world’s most advanced artificial-intelligence programs and ordinary people. The objective? To find out whether a computer can act “more human” than a person. In his own quest to beat the machines, the author discovers that the march of technology isn’t just changing how we live, it’s raising new questions about what it means to be human.

By Brian Christian
The Atlantic
Read it!


Steven Strogatz on the Elements of Math

Steven Strogatz, an award-winning professor, takes readers from the basics to the baffling in a 15-part series on mathematics. Beginning with a column on why numbers are helpful, he goes on to investigate topics including negative numbers, calculus and group theory, finishing with the mysteries of infinity. — New York Times

Read it!


Low-allergenic wines could stifle sniffles and sneezes in millions of wine drinkers

Scientists have identified a mysterious culprit that threatens headaches, stuffy noses, skin rash and other allergy symptoms when more than 500 million people worldwide drink wine. The discovery could help winemakers in developing the first low allergenic vintages — reds and whites with less potential to trigger allergy symptoms, they say. The new study appears in ACS’ monthly Journal of Proteome Research.

Read It!